Why I Like Volunteering for East London Vision Charity

Some of us reach our ambitions, others don’t and some people have no idea which path to take but are looking for fulfilment.  As I wandered along my path looking at various side tracks I knew I wanted something that satisfied my need, as well as being of benefit to others.

I had worked in various professions, but I hadn’t found the one thing that set my soul on fire.  Then a miracle happened which gave me hope, I stumbled across an organisation called East London Vision looking for volunteers.  No matter how young or old you were you could help someone.  Skilled, unskilled you were offered training and there were a wide variety of causes to choose from.

As I have a disability that worries me, which is my failing eyesight, I was scared about how I would cope, but I feared even more the thought of becoming useless.  So I decided to apply as a volunteer without hesitation because I wanted to learn about life with no vision and to enhance my skills.  I had stereotyped visually impaired people as lifeless like vegetables, unable to do anything or move around, and wondered if I might get bored helping them.  I remember my first invitation to an event which was an awards evening.  I thought it was going to be a very formal affair and boring, but surprisingly it wasn’t! I saw blind and visually impaired people in a different perspective.  There was entertainment and to my amazement people were dancing and having fun.  They were enjoying life with a little bit of support.

Being new to volunteering with other vision impaired people, the users were more than understanding.  Sometimes I would make a mistake, but they were very supportive of me, and it made me feel valuable to them.  The best thing about helping other VI people is they’re all different and know how they want to be supported.  I had discovered so much about the users and have enjoyed many activities from coffee mornings, outings and even sport!

There are no barriers to becoming a volunteer as you’re given the skills to fulfil the role that’s needed.  The age range varies, but we all enjoy getting together, and the advantage is the older people teach the younger ones and the younger ones teach the older ones.

Before volunteering, I was feeling like my social life was to an end, but with the encouragement of the people I met, users and staff, to become more active in activities, I am feeling the benefits of belonging to ELVis.  I have been given a new lease of life which I love and I have learnt so much.

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Photo of Christine standing in front of a palm tree in Hackney.

Written by Christine Maker, Volunteer for East London Vision

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Masuma’s Employment Journey in the Sight Loss Sector

“How did you end up working for the sight loss sector?”

This is one of the questions I most often get asked by people, and the one I regularly hear being discussed is whether most blind and partially sighted people end up working for the sight loss sector.

There are around 84,000 registered blind people of working age (18-65 year olds) in the UK, and only 21,000 (1 in 4 compared to 3 in 4 sighted people) of the working age population are in employment.

I feel extremely fortunate to be in the working age figure. My employment journey started with a part-time role as a Braille transcriber at a mainstream college. This job was a great starting point for me in the world of work and being part-time provided me with the opportunity to volunteer and upskill myself at the same time. I initially looked for volunteering roles away from the sight loss sector, not because I had anything against it, but simply due to not having given it any thought.

However, I learnt very quickly that it was rather difficult to find a voluntary role with organisations outside the sector. Also having received feedback from employers that I didn’t have enough experience, I resorted to looking for volunteering opportunities within the sight loss sector and landed myself a number of various roles. To be told by employers that you don’t have enough experience and struggling to even gain a voluntary role outside of the sector was soul destroying, it is a horrible catch-22 situation, which certainly didn’t do my confidence any good. However, the good news is that it seems things have moved on somewhat as I know several people who have volunteered with organisations away from the sight loss sector. Yes, I’m sure it can still be a struggle, but hopefully things are slowly changing.

Not only did the volunteering opportunities allow me to grow and increase my skills, knowledge and experience, it provided a good platform to network. My voluntary role at Waltham Forest Vision (formerly known as Low Vision Forum) resulted in a successful application and interview on a trainee contract. This set my journey into the sight loss sector and I’ve never looked back!

However, to assume every blind or partially sighted person ends up working for the VI sector is completely incorrect. I know just as many vision impaired people who work in the sector as well as don’t.

I would strongly encourage all VI people looking for work to take up volunteering opportunities, to network and build good rapport with people. Some may say I’m one of the lucky ones, and whilst there may be a very small element of truth, it certainly wasn’t all smooth sailing. The struggle of finding employment was real and can definitely be that much harder for vision impaired people. However, despite experiencing knock-backs throughout my employment journey, my proactive self-help approach, positive can-do attitude and, at times, throwing myself into the unknown certainly paid off. I am truly grateful and thankful to the people who have both personally and professionally supported me along the way.

Masuma Ali
Photo of Masuma smiling.

Listen to Masuma talk to the Thomas Pocklington Trust about her life and employment journey in the sight loss sector.

Written by Masuma Ali

 

‘The Who’s Tommy’ Musical Experience

Hello lovely people,

Just wanted to say what a great time I had when I was guiding a member of the Beyond Sight Loss social group to the theatre.

The group went to see a rock musical called ‘The Who’s Tommy’ at the Theatre Royal in Stratford, east London.

Before the show began the group were given a touch tour where they met some of the performers, feel the props and see the stage up close. A lot of the members said having the touch tour was a fantastic idea and helped them visualise the story better when listening to the audio description of the show.

When the show started the fun began. I saw some of the people in the audience get up from their seats to dance, and others began singing along with the songs. Some of The Who songs featured in the show included ‘Tommy Can You Hear Me’, ‘I’m Free’, ‘See Me’, ‘Feel Me’, and ‘Pinball Wizard’ – all of which were my favourite songs to listen to when I was growing up.

Overall, the show was a memorable experience for all the members of Beyond Sight Loss. Everyone mentioned how energetic the ‘Tommy’ cast were, and that they would be recommending the show to family and friends. I must say that if you’re a fan of the music by The Who this musical is worth watching!

Finally, I would like to thank Ashrafia Choudhury, Chair of Beyond Sight Loss, for making this trip happen and for all the support and guidance that she does for the group.

For more information about ‘The Who’s Tommy’ please visit the following website link: http://www.stratfordeast.com/whats-on/all-shows/tommy

Written by Christine Edmead