How to Avoid Being the Victim of Fraud

Recently, a group of vision impaired people living in Redbridge received an informative talk from the local Metropolitan Police team.  The police officers spoke about some of the scams currently operating in the UK that target all people regardless of age, background and income levels.

Here are 10 Golden Rules to remember to help you beat the scammers and protect yourself from fraud.

  1. Be suspicious of all ‘Too good to be true’ offers and deals. There are no guaranteed get-rich-quick schemes.
  2. Do not agree to offers or deals immediately. Insist on time to obtain independent/legal advice before making a decision.
  3. Do not hand over money or sign anything until you’ve checked the credentials of the company or individual.
  4. Never send money to anyone you do not know or trust, whether in the UK or abroad, or use methods of payment that you are not comfortable with.
  5. Never give banking or personal details to anyone you do not know or trust. This information is valuable so make sure to protect it.
  6. Always log on to a website directly rather than clicking on links provided in an email.
  7. Do not rely solely on glowing testimonials: find solid independent evidence of a company’s success.
  8. Always get independent/legal advice if an offer involves money, time or commitment.
  9. If you spot a scam or have been scammed, report it and get help. Contact ActionFraud on 0300 123 2040 or online at actionfraud.police.uk.  Contact the Police if the suspect is known or still in the area.
  10. Do not be embarrassed to report a scam. Because the scammers are cunning and clever there is no shame in being deceived. By reporting you will make it more difficult for them to deceive others.

In addition, important information by the RNIB regarding cash machine crime prevention; firstly, only use a cash machine if you feel comfortable with your surroundings.  Secondly, make sure that you’re happy with the machine itself, which you can do by feeling where your cash will be dispensed to check if it is free from any obstructions.  Remember, if in doubt, use a machine inside a bank branch or retailer as it is less likely to have been tampered with.

Thank you to the Redbridge Metropolitan Police for giving a talk to our members on how to keep safe and scams to be aware of.

Written by Ray Calamaan, ELVis Communications Coordinator

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How the White Cane Changed Bhavini’s Life!

“I knew I had to stop feeling embarrassed, ashamed and insecure about having a visual impairment and start putting my safety first!”

I was first introduced to a symbol cane, which is small and thin in size.  Its primary function is to let others know that you have a visual impairment and you’re supposed to hold it vertically in front of your body.  It provided me with safety going out in public as people took care to avoid bumping into me.  I would use my symbol cane whilst being guided by my husband.

As my vision deteriorated, going out on my own meant the symbol cane wasn’t enough.  I contemplated whether I could take such a big step by switching to a white cane, which is bigger and longer with a rollerball at the end, and actually use it rather than just hold it which meant everyone could see that I am blind.  I wouldn’t be able to deny or hide my visual impairment or pretend that I wasn’t anymore.

I must say that using a white cane made me feel quite vulnerable and somewhat a fraud.  I mean, I felt I didn’t ‘look blind’, and I was fairly young when I started using it and didn’t know anyone else my age using a cane.  However, when I began to use my white cane more I became comfortable using stairs and escalators.  Furthermore, I discovered that I was able to avoid bumping into bollards, lamp posts, public dustbins, parked cars and any other obstacles, and because of this my confidence grew, which lead to me feeling empowered as I became more independent.  In addition, people became aware and offered help and support.  Also, I’ve learned that bus drivers are required to stop when they see a person with a white cane at the bus stop, which is one of other benefits of using a white cane.

If you’d like a white cane then contact your local Sensory Team as they should be able to provide you with one which has been measured to suit you.  Training is also given on how to correctly hold and use the cane whilst taking care of your posture.

The main advantage of using a white cane is personal safety.  A white cane detects textured surfaces allowing you to distinguish between a pavement and a crossing point.  Most crossing points have a tactile bumpy surface to indicate when a crossing is approaching.  At train stations, your white cane will detect the bumpy lines when you approach stairs and platform edges.

After finding myself in various difficult and dangerous situations in the past, I decided it was time to put my safety first and for my precious daughters too.  I was ashamed and embarrassed of what others would think of me, but I cannot tell you how much I love my white cane now.  It has given me the confidence and independence I need to enable me to go out without feeling scared or anxious, allowing me to feel free and in control.  I’ve even taken my cane on holiday!

Using the combination of both my cane and assistance from transport providers like National Rail and TFL, I can now get around independently with ease.

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Bhavini takes her cane wherever she goes! Photo of Bhavini wearing an astronaut suit and holding her white cane on the surface of the moon.

Written by Bhavini Makwana