An Interview with an ECLO

In this week’s ELVis blog post, I share an interview with an ECLO based in East London.

What does ECLO stand for?

ECLO stands for Eye Clinic Liaison Officer.

What does an ECLO do?

That is a really difficult question!  An ECLO works directly with people with low vision, deteriorating vision, sight loss or impending sight loss, and their carers.  The support is both practical and emotional, is for people of all ages and is extended to carers and family members.  They provide timely one to one support and quality information and advice, emotional support and access to other statutory and voluntary services.  ECLOs connect people with the practical and emotional support they need to understand their diagnosis, deal with their sight loss and maintain their independence.  The ECLO has the time to dedicate to people following their appointment, so they can discuss the impact their condition will have on their life.

For example, one of the people I support I met when they were diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP).  This came as a complete shock for them as they had never heard of this condition.  As an ECLO I was able to give them the time, space and support they needed to process this information.  I was able to give them information on RP in layman’s terms, refer to their local sensory team and link them with local charities such as the RNIB, East London Vision and RP Fighting Blindness.  I am still in regular contact with this individual, who is still working in his job with support from Access to Work, has accessed Personal Independence Payments and is receiving counselling to help him process everything.

That is just one example; ECLO’s can support anyone who has sight loss at any point in their journey.  If a patient has a question, then an ECLO will find the answer and put them into contact with the right people.

How long does it take you to train to be an ECLO?

The RNIB in partnership with the Royal College of London provide ECLO training which takes around 3 months to complete. This consists of 4 days training in person learning a range of 18 different modules from eye conditions to emotional support. This is followed by an exam and essay around 3 months later.

How many ECLOs are in each hospital?

Unfortunately, not every hospital with an eye clinic has an ECLO (yet!) and the ones that do generally only has 1.  The RNIB have produced a document with a list of every ECLO and what hospital they are based in.  If anyone would like to find out if their hospital and eye clinic has an ECLO, you can find out via the following link: https://www.rnib.org.uk/sites/default/files/Eclo_role_report.doc

How do you get an ECLO to assist you?

If anyone is interested in getting support from their local ECLO, they can find the details in the link posted above and contact them directly.  Alternatively, next time you’re in the hospital you can ask a member of staff who should be able to introduce you.

Do you like your job?

I love my job!  Every day is completely different, and you get to meet some amazing people along the way.  It can be really challenging but it is one of the most rewarding jobs I have had the pleasure to do.

What is a normal working day like for you?

That is an impossible question to answer, as every day is different whether it is supporting individuals in clinic, chasing Certificates of Visual Impairments or making referrals.

Written by Christine Edmead, ELVis Administration and Information Officer

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