How I’m Preparing to Run The Vitality Big Half Marathon

The journey so far

I am approximately half way through training for the Big Half, with exactly a month to go.  My first run was a test to make sure I could actually run for at least 30 minutes without collapsing in a big heap on the floor, which fortunately did not happen, and I felt invigorated to create a training plan, using resources from The Big Half marathon website and gathering advice and tips from friends who have previously run marathons.

There were a few initial points to tick off, and which I’ve already experienced the benefit of: get a good pair of running shoes, build up distance and time gradually, download a running app to track progress and take rest days in between big runs.  I wrote up my plan with weekly goals of what distance/time I wanted to reach.  Then suddenly the fear set in, and for the first week and a half of that plan I couldn’t bring myself to run.  I procrastinated through other means of building up my overall fitness; a yoga class, swimming and a couple of long cycles.  This definitely wasn’t a bad idea, as it gave me a chance to exercise and stretch other muscles in the body.

The breakthrough

Thankfully, with some encouragement, I managed to part ways with that apprehension and completed my first 5km run, and survived (side note: stretching afterwards is SO important!).  Each time I’ve trained since I’ve enjoyed it.  I realised that years of telling myself that I wasn’t a runner had instilled a belief that it must be an awful experience.  Running is certainly still challenging, and requires a lot of preparation [tip: set aside a good couple of hours for each run, to find that state of mind, warm up and cool down, perhaps take a shower after], and those first twenty minutes, for me personally, are a huge hurdle.  The self-doubt floods in, and I think about going home, or walking to the nearest coffee shop.  No, that can wait, I remind myself.

It’s all in the recovery

Last week I met with another friend who is taking part in the Big Half and we made more plans – but this time it wasn’t so much about the training, but for what comes afterwards: the Recovery. A huge meal on the Sunday afternoon post-race, then a sauna trip the next day and some more yoga to stretch out our sore muscles.  It’s also important, however, to build in room for recovery at every stage in preparing for the half marathon, and remember that you can’t expect to do it all in one go!

It was a great turning point to start thinking about what follows the race, and that there is still the rest of life to get on with once it’s over, but for now I am taking it, quite literally, one step at a time.  And with just four weeks left I’ve still got some way to go, and every little bit of support has given me a massive boost.  You can follow more of my training progress on Twitter and donate via my fundraising page here: https://mydonate.bt.com/fundraisers/joannalally1

Thanks for reading and all your support so far!  And if you’re free on Sunday 4 March then please come and join East London Vision to cheer me on along with the other race participants!

You can also watch my interview with Ray from East London Vision.

Written by Joanna Lally

 

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What It’s Like to Work at East London Vision

As some of you may know, I’m fairly new to East London Vision having only started in April this year.  I can tell you that my job has changed my life for the better, as previously I was unemployed and job hunting for a considerable while.  I held a belief that my vision impairment was a barrier to employment, so when I was given an opportunity to work at ELVis I became optimistic again about my future.

Truth-be-told, during my first month at ELVis, getting used to working part-time was challenging, but I quickly adapted, which does happen when you get into a regular routine.  Moreover, working in a small, but amazing team I must say I feel very lucky.  When you have characters like Christine Edmead (ELVis Administrator and Information Officer) in the office, the working day is never a boring one!  She is “Mother Hen of ELVis” and always looking after the team.  On one occasion, she brought delicious cupcakes to the team meeting which everyone enjoyed eating!

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Photo of the delicious cupcakes brought by Christine.  Three cupcakes are covered in green frosting and decorated with rainbow sprinkles and a gold star in the center.  The fourth cupcake has vanilla frosting and a miniature carrot.

The best part of working for ELVis is the opportunity to go along to service user activities.  My favourite activities this year were white water rafting and the kayaking sessions as I love to take part in water-based activities, and it’s great to get out of the office and do something physical once in a while.  Furthermore, it’s fantastic to see the positive difference the activities make in the lives of those who participate in them.  I promote the success of service user participation on the ELVIs social media channels, which help to raise awareness about the really great things ELVis does for vision impaired people in east London.

Additionally, working closely with the East London Local Society groups I’ve become acquainted with the service users and have learned about the challenges they have overcome and still face as a result of their sight loss.  And I’ve been able to highlight their stories online, especially through the blog which receives very positive feedback from our blog readers.

What can I say? These past 9 months working at ELVis has been really fulfilling.  I feel blessed to be working again.  Now I wake up in the morning thinking I’ve got plenty of things to keep me busy, instead of wondering how to spend my day.  It’s been rewarding to work for a charity because I know the work I am doing is helping to improve people’s lives, and as a vision impaired individual it feels great to be supporting my peers.

Lastly, before I go, I’d like to say thank you to everyone who’s supported East London Vision in 2017 and I wish you all a very successful and happy New Year!

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Photo of Ray (center) with the ELVis team.

Written by Ray Calamaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Team ELVis at National Eye Health Week 2017

In this week’s blog, I’m going to be sharing what Team ELVis got up to during National Eye Health Week (18th – 24th September) in partnership with local optometrists, health and social care professionals, and the voluntary sector.

On Tuesday, we had an ELVis stall at the Sainsbury’s Supermarket in Whitechapel to raise awareness about what we do as a charity and the importance of getting an eye examination. It was a successful day. We spoke to lots of people who had not been for an eye examination in recent years and encouraged them to make an appointment at their local opticians.

Then on Wednesday, we were at Queen’s Hospital in Romford and joined by the local vision impaired group, Sight Action Havering. We had another successful day promoting the charity and sharing lots of helpful eye health tips with hospital patients and visitors.

Our final day of National Eye Health Week activities took place on Thursday. We spent the day at Chrisp Street Market in Poplar speaking to the local community. It was a chilly day but we braved the cold. Moreover, we managed to sign up a new ELVis member. The biggest challenge of the day was ensuring that we didn’t lose our leaflets to the wind!!

During the week we handed out plenty of freebies – pens, trolley coin keyrings, magnets, and mints – which were really popular!

Although National Eye Health Week has ended it’s important to continue looking after your eyes.  Did you know that there is a link between smoking and increased risk of blindness and eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD)?

Furthermore, to limit the risk of developing an eye condition it’s recommended by the NHS that you should undergo a sight examination at least once every two years.

More information on keeping your eyes healthy can be found by visiting: www.visionmatters.org.uk

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Photo of Sight Action Havering members (Mike, Tracy, Maureen, Sandra and Izzy the guide dog) and Team ELVis (Ray and Graham).

Written by Masuma Ali

 

Bhavini’s Experience at the RP Fighting Blindness Conference

The RP Fighting Blindness Charity held its first Families Conference earlier this month which saw around 30 families come together to meet others who have similar Retinal Dystrophies all going through the same situations.

Guest speakers shared their knowledge on the latest research, genetic counselling, support services available to both adults and children affected, as well as inspirational stories from those living with RP but have gone on to achieve their ambitions and not let their vision impairment hold them back. The members who attended were able to spend time with each other during the weekend and so did the children over activities that were planned for them. The workshops on offer for all to participate in provided additional sources of support and information.

As an ambassador for RP Fighting Blindness, I was invited to speak about my experience of living with Retinitis Pigmentosa. From a shocking diagnosis, moving to London, bringing up children, and then finally getting the support I desperately needed, I finally accepted and came to terms with my sight loss. I found ways I could relive my life; from volunteering, setting up a social group, organising charity fundraisers and now working for East London Vision.

“Was I nervous presenting at my first public speaking event? –most definitely. Would I do it again? – yes indeed.” I had learned that the biggest help and support I received was from another vision impaired professional who knew exactly what I was going through and how I felt. In fact, this is exactly what people said to me about my talk and how they could all relate.

Attending as a delegate was very useful, not only for me but for my family as well. My daughters met other children with vision impaired parents and children who were affected with sight loss too. It was a great opportunity for them to share their feelings over fun activity sessions and during times of socialising. Equally, my husband met other partners in the same situation and it was certainly a great bonding time for them. Moreover, I felt that my parents, who attended their first RP information day ever, found it extremely useful and engaging by talking to other parents and seeing how other people with RP cope and manage in different ways.

Overall, it was a fantastically organised weekend and very much-needed. It was a privilege to have been asked to speak at the event but at the same time thrilled to have been part of it; gaining and sharing lots of information, and connecting with others.

One aspect which I can take away from the weekend, and would love to share with others is – please talk about your emotional journey, whether it be to a family, friend or professional, as there is always someone who can help and you do not have to go through it alone.

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Photo of Bhavini standing in front of a RP Fighting Blindness poster at the RP Families Conference.

If would like to listen to my talk at the RP conference please click on the YouTube video directly below.

Written by Bhavini Makwana