The Hazards of Shared Spaces, Pavement Parking and Street Furniture

As confident as I may seem, there are things that really frighten me and actually put my life at risk!

It has been an ongoing dilemma for decades and it affects me now that I use a white cane as much as it affected me before.

Inconsiderate drivers who park on the pavement who force me to walk on the road, drivers who start to move whilst I’m still making my way across the zebra crossing, or even electric vehicles.

Vision impaired people rely on their hearing in addition to other senses or aids to distinguish when it is safe to cross the road, but electric vehicles, which make less noise than other vehicles, are dangerous, especially if the drivers are pre-occupied and not concentrating on the road.

Shared spaces is also a common battle that people with disabilities keep having to face and it’s about time that businesses, motorists and councils took this matter seriously.

Rubbish bins and bags, bike rails, A-boards and other displays businesses place on pavements are constant obstacles that people with disabilities have to try and navigate through. Before using my white cane, I fell over a carpet roll that was on display in front of a shop. I badly injured my hip and knees and was bruised quite a lot. On another occasion, I was shouted at and abused just because I knocked over an A-board, but they had no idea how terrible I felt, how much confidence it took away and how I felt scared of walking on main roads.

I really wish the general public would consider these small factors that could prevent hazards and not put disabled people’s lives at risk.

Having to walk out into the road with young children to avoid dustbins, overgrown bushes or a vehicle parked on the pavement, terrified me. I would wait for ages until I knew I couldn’t hear the sound of moving traffic, asking my children for confirmation.

Some areas have also removed the dropped kerb and made the pavement and road all one level which is so difficult to identify, especially when tactile paving is not used. I just wouldn’t know when I had entered the road and when I was back on the pavement. It is absolutely crazy that councils would agree for this to be introduced.

Blind and partially sighted people have to compromise their safety in all types of shared space situations which can certainly decrease their confidence in getting out and about.  All this does is increase isolation and the fear of the worst. I know as this is how I feel when faced with these circumstances.

If you find yourself in a similar situation, you can get in touch with your local council to let them know about the problem.  Councils are in a good position to make changes in this area.  For example, Hackney Council has announced a zero-tolerance policy on A-boards.  You can also contact TfL to let them know about an issue local to you, using this link: https://tfl.gov.uk/help-and-contact/contact-us-about-streets-and-other-road-issues.  TfL launched Operation Clearway in 2015, which aims to tackle part of this problem by engaging with businesses about their responsibilities to keep the pavements safe, and prosecuting businesses who refuse to remove their street furniture.

If you would like more information or to get more involved in this issue, you can get in touch with Transport for All, who have recently mounted a campaign to make the Government more aware of the problems with shared spaces: http://www.transportforall.org.uk/about/news/petition-against-shared-space-signed-by-50-organisations.

You can also sign this petition urging the Government to take swift action to tackle unsafe pavement parking: https://e-activist.com/page/27482/petition/1?ea.tracking.id=f8863c91.

Written by Bhavini Makwana, ELVis Activities Co-ordinator.

Photo showing Bhavini and her sighted guide walking along a high street, navigating around parked vehicles, A-boards and shop displays.
Photo showing Bhavini and her sighted guide walking along a high street, navigating around parked vehicles, A-boards and shop displays.
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Beyond Sight Loss Fundraising Event Success

Just wanted to share with you what a great time I had when I attended a fundraising event.  The event was hosted by and in aid of Beyond Sight Loss which is a peer led support group for visually impaired people living in Tower Hamlets.

It was an excellent evening.  There was music being played in the background and lots of raffle prizes were won by the members, which included high street vouchers, teddy bears and exhibition tickets.  Beyond Sight Loss are very grateful to the individuals and organisations who donated their prizes to the group.  Moreover, prizes were handed out to members who were able to give correct answers to ‘Guess the Weight of the Cake’ and “How Many Sweets in a Jar”.

Members also enjoyed their three-course meal.  It included samosas for starters, Undhiu (a variety of unusual vegetables, prepared slowly with small mildly spiced dumplings), served with naan and raitha for the main course, and mango sorbet for desert.  The food tasted fresh and was very delicious to eat!

Towards the end of the evening, everyone was in a great mood.  The members were dancing on the dance floor and having a fantastic time.  What can I say?  The fundraising event was a success and I’m already looking forward to next year!

Well done Beyond Sight Loss for putting on such a great event and to chairwoman Ashrafia Chouldhury for making it all possible.  Congratulations!

Written by Christine Edmead, ELVis Administration and Information Officer