Assistance at Train Stations, is it Needed?

This question has recently come up in various conversations with blind and partially sighted people.  With all things vision impaired related, there is no right or wrong answer!

Let’s face it, sometimes life can be stressful enough without worrying about how to get to the train station platform, or in my case if I’ll end up on the correct loop of the Central Line on the London Underground.  I don’t particularly have a desire for ending up somewhere I don’t need to be!   At times, the journey to the station itself can be taxing enough and it is reassuring to know that assistance should generally be available once at the underground station if I require it.

Around 13 years ago I certainly wouldn’t have classed myself as an independent traveller, but knowing that assistance would be available most definitely helped build my confidence to venture out.  I’ve recently been asking myself would I have plucked up the courage to travel on the underground had there been no assistance available?  Based on how little confidence I had, the answer is probably not.  However, would I continue to use trains if assistance wasn’t available now?  Absolutely yes!  I can’t imagine giving up the freedom of everything I do, from work to socialising.

I still remember my first experience of not being met off the train at Liverpool Street Station.  I felt so distressed that I just wanted to cry, which wasn’t the most sensible approach, but panic took over and logic went out the window!  With my more experienced head on, I now use other senses such as hearing what direction people are walking, listening for sounds of the ticket barriers beeping or escalators, etc.  Smell is another equally valuable sense as the smell of coffee is generally, but not always, a good sign that you are heading towards the exit, or if you know the station it can help you get your bearings.  Nowadays, if I’m not met off the train then I’ll grumble about it without the feeling of sheer panic taking over and will happily ask a member of the public to point me in the right direction.  There is no denying that things do go wrong and many times I haven’t been met off the train, or had to wait ages for assistance.  However, I am most definitely grateful that the service exists.

The countering view by some people is that many other countries do not offer the service we receive here in the UK and blind and partially sighted people manage, so why couldn’t we cope?  Just because people get by, does it mean they wouldn’t want the service?

I believe it is better to have a service than not have one at all, as it gives people the choice to use it or not.

It would be great to hear other people’s thoughts on whether they think staff assistance is needed at train stations?  Please leave a comment and share your own personal experiences and stories of how you started to use trains.

Photo of Masuma using her cane stepping of a London Underground train.
Photo of Masuma with her white cane stepping off a London Underground tube train.

Written by Masuma Ali, ELVis CEO

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Christine’s Sweet Bread Pudding Recipe

Thought I would share another recipe with you which I love making.  I love to make bread pudding because you just use your hands to make it.  I have so much fun squeezing the water out of the bread, not sure that my kitchen enjoys it as I sometimes make a bit of a mess but that where the fun comes in, well it does for me!

Bread Pudding Ingredients:

  • One loaf of white bread
  • 4 oz Butter or margarine
  • 4 oz Sugar
  • 33g Mixed spice
  • 8 oz  Sultanas
  1. Preheat the oven to 180C, 180C Fan or Gas 4.
  2. Soak the bread in water. Squeeze the water out of the bread and place in a large mixing bowl.
  3. Add the butter/margarine use your hands to squeeze the butter/margarine into the wet bread.
  4. Add the sugar, mixed spice and sultanas to the mixture.
  5. Place the mixture into a baking dish, then add some nobs of butter on top of the mixture.
  6. Bake in the oven for 1 hour, or until golden-brown on top.

HAVE FUN, HAPPY BAKING

chicken-divan
Photo of bread pudding with a crispy golden-brown top.

Written by Christine Edmead, ELVis Administration and Information Officer

How to Avoid Being the Victim of Fraud

Recently, a group of vision impaired people living in Redbridge received an informative talk from the local Metropolitan Police team.  The police officers spoke about some of the scams currently operating in the UK that target all people regardless of age, background and income levels.

Here are 10 Golden Rules to remember to help you beat the scammers and protect yourself from fraud.

  1. Be suspicious of all ‘Too good to be true’ offers and deals. There are no guaranteed get-rich-quick schemes.
  2. Do not agree to offers or deals immediately. Insist on time to obtain independent/legal advice before making a decision.
  3. Do not hand over money or sign anything until you’ve checked the credentials of the company or individual.
  4. Never send money to anyone you do not know or trust, whether in the UK or abroad, or use methods of payment that you are not comfortable with.
  5. Never give banking or personal details to anyone you do not know or trust. This information is valuable so make sure to protect it.
  6. Always log on to a website directly rather than clicking on links provided in an email.
  7. Do not rely solely on glowing testimonials: find solid independent evidence of a company’s success.
  8. Always get independent/legal advice if an offer involves money, time or commitment.
  9. If you spot a scam or have been scammed, report it and get help. Contact ActionFraud on 0300 123 2040 or online at actionfraud.police.uk.  Contact the Police if the suspect is known or still in the area.
  10. Do not be embarrassed to report a scam. Because the scammers are cunning and clever there is no shame in being deceived. By reporting you will make it more difficult for them to deceive others.

In addition, important information by the RNIB regarding cash machine crime prevention; firstly, only use a cash machine if you feel comfortable with your surroundings.  Secondly, make sure that you’re happy with the machine itself, which you can do by feeling where your cash will be dispensed to check if it is free from any obstructions.  Remember, if in doubt, use a machine inside a bank branch or retailer as it is less likely to have been tampered with.

Thank you to the Redbridge Metropolitan Police for giving a talk to our members on how to keep safe and scams to be aware of.

Written by Ray Calamaan, ELVis Communications Coordinator