What it’s Like to be a Support Worker in the Sight Loss Sector

Previous to my current role at East London Vision, I was a support worker to a vision impaired person, and at first I was not sure what a support worker was.  After a general chat about my role with my client I had a better understanding of what my responsibilities were.

Let me tell you this- being a support worker is a role that comes with a high level of responsibility.  This officially means the person being supported must be at the centre of everything at all times when on the job!

A support worker’s day is driven by the person they are supporting.  I found that no two days were ever the same, which was great!  I had to remember that I was there to support the person and enable them to do their job and not take over it!  I supported them with tasks like preparing reports, giving presentations, reading the post and completing forms.  I would also help provide emotional support to patients at the eye clinic.  However, members of staff would think they had a new team member and would try to delegate work to me!  But I and the person I was supporting would quickly remind staff that I was not working for them.

In addition, I met people who would speak to me rather than the person I was supporting.  This was upsetting for both myself and the person I was supporting, but we soon learned how to resolve this.  If a person spoke to me, then I would not respond, which quickly led to the person realizing who they should have been addressing in the first place!

Most of my happiest years were working as a support worker because I truly loved my job.  I learned a great deal from the person I supported because they made me look at things from a different angle.

Over the years I formed a close friendship with this person.  We learned to trust each other because we worked closely together almost every day, and we’ve even shared many laughs.   I’m happy to say we’re friends for life!

 

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Christine serving tea to Graham at the ELVis office

Written by Christine Edmead, ELVis Communications Coordinator

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Managing Your Food Allergy When You’re Vision Impaired

As a partially sighted individual with food allergies, managing my allergies has been challenging.  For example, when I’m eating at a restaurant, the menu isn’t always written in large print, or when I go food shopping, it’s often difficult to read the ingredients on food packaging.  Because of this, I’ve learned to take a proactive approach towards managing my allergies so I’m able to eat safely at home or when I’m dining out.

I hope you will learn something from my advice to help you better manage your food allergies.  Even if you don’t have a food allergy, you may know someone who has one so you can pass on the advice to them.

Firstly, get to know your allergy medication.  If you have little or no sight make sure you have a feel of what your medication looks like.  If you carry an Epipen then it’s vital that you’re trained how to use it.  You can book an appointment with your allergy clinic at your local hospital via a GP referral to get training.  Moreover, if you carry different medication, you can add labels on them to tell them apart easily.  A list of different types of labels (i.e. audio, tactile) sold by the RNIB can be found by clicking on this link: https://bit.ly/1Z7pOsy.  Also, remember to have your medication next to you at the table when you’re dining out so it’s at arm’s reach if you ever need it.

Secondly, use assistive technology.  There are many smartphone Apps such as the Seeing AI app which can read back to you if you point the phone’s camera at text.   If you aren’t tech savvy or own a smartphone, don’t be shy to ask someone to help you read the menu or food label.  If you have some sight always carry around a hand-held magnifier.  At home, use large print labels on food containers, or you can use different numbers of rubber bands to identify different tinned products.

Thirdly, this one may seem obvious- tell people about your allergies.  When I dine out, I always notify the server or restaurant manager of my peanut and tree nut allergy so they can check if they’re able to provide me a nut-free meal.  Furthermore, talking openly about your allergies raises awareness as you’ll be surprised that not everyone knows that having a food allergy can be fatal.

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Image of foods likely to cause allergies includes shellfish, nuts, dairy, alcohol and fresh fruits.

Written by Ray Calamaan, ELVis Communications Coordinator

Using a Smartphone as a Light Detector

As a blind person, there are often times when I need to be able to detect sources of light.  This may be to see if it is light outside, if an electric light has been left on, or if the power LED on an electronic device is on.  In the past, RNIB sold a device about the size of a marker pen which gave out a sound that changed according to the level of light that it was pointing at.  Sadly, RNIB no longer stocks this device, but fortunately it is possible to use a smartphone to do this.

Recently everyone in the building I live in got new door phone systems allowing people to call the flat they require from the outer door and be let in.  This door phone system has a privacy setting so you can choose not to hear if someone rings your door.  When privacy is switched on, there is a LED that glows to indicate that it is on but there is no other way of knowing whether privacy is on or off.  The button that turns privacy on and off is like a doorbell so you can’t tell by the position of the switch.

Fortunately, there are a number of apps which turn a smartphone into a light detector.  I have used two of them on the iPhone and both these apps are free.  Both detected the presence of the privacy LED on my door phone.

There is a standalone app called Boop Light Detector.  When in this app the phone emits a tone which changes according to how much light there is.  It can also vibrate and the vibration gets faster the more light there is.  This can be useful if checking for light in noisy environments.  The App Store link to this app is https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/boop-light-detector/id1134857212?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D8

Some time ago I reviewed the Seeing AI app from Microsoft which you can read here.  This app has been updated and one of the new features is the light detector channel.  This produces a tone which increases in pitch the more light there is.  At this time there is no vibration feature but if you are used to using Seeing AI then this could be a good choice.  The link to Seeing AI in the App Store is https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/seeing-ai-talking-camera-for-the-blind/id999062298?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D8

I have been advised that there is an Android light detector app called Free Motion Light Detector.  The Google Play Store link is https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.visionandroid.apps.motionsensor&hl=en_GB

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Photo of a man pointing his smartphone towards a light in the ceiling. Image is from Google Images.

Written by Graham Page